Late coming June 2013 CFPS Blog

Dear all

A CFPS Blog hasn’t been published for some time – nearly 2 months in fact! Sorry about that. I’ll focus on one main issue: the draft District Plan; but also at the bottom is an update on the opportunity to find out more about the archaeological dig now ongoing to prepare the ground for the Keynes III development. I’ll intersperse with some pictures mainly from the last picnic, beating of the bounds; but also how the fields have looked recently; and the repaired bench, where some of the best views over  the landscape can be had.  The weather has been a bit gloomy today, hopefully the images  will add a bit of brightness to a drab and grey day!

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May blossom on an old Southern Slopes apple tree, presumably dating from Mount’s Nursery days in the mid 20th century (long before the University existed)

Local (District) Plan: Consultation, University Master Plan draft policy, SHLAA sites

Today is the day on which the consultation over Canterbury City Council (CCC)’s District Plan and associated policy formally begins, please click on CCC Planning Consultation Page for more . Most readers will be aware that this is the most significant policy document in relation to planning, place, landscape and environment to emerge at local government for Canterbury, Whitstable, Herne Bay, and all the villages for years, and will be the main frame of reference for decision making  for the next two decades. Accordingly, its substantive content and priorities are absolutely crucial for the quality of life and environment of local communities well into the future  (and long beyond the timeframe of local and national elections).It is good to know that local people and interested parties have a  relatively generous timeframe for responding to the plan – until the end of August. This seems proportionate, given the significance of the document.

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Picknickers on Dover Down field, Chaucer fields ,5th may 2013

This process of engagement  is very much needed. That’s because, in general, the Local Plan is highly controversial, not least because  the claims made within it about the scale of housing need are contested by many informed observers. It also provides an opportunity for anyone who believes the cases for concentrated house building on several key greenfield sites have not been sufficiently  made, and that the deleterious potential consequences of proceeding with them have not been recognised, to express their views (individually, and through local groups, including residents’ associations, and environmental and heritage groups).

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Richard Navarro and fellow musicians of all ages, Dover down field, Chaucer fields, 5th may 2013

I have my own provisional views on these general issues, and will submit a representation to the process in due course, But for now, I simply feel the need to be much better informed. If you are in the same boat, you may consider attending an upcoming event: the Canterbury Society is organising  a “Local Plan Open Meeting” at the United Reformed Church Hall in Watling Street at 7.30 pm on Tuesday 25 June. Attenders will have the chance to pose questions to both the political and delivery leadership of CCC (John Gilbey and Colin Carmichael). This is an open meeting, all are welcome. please do try  to come if  you can.

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Impromptu football game on Dover  Down field, Chaucer fields, at picnic, 5th may 2013

How are Chaucer Fields and the Southern Slopes treated in the draft Local Plan? In my opinion, there’s one very sensible but under-reported policy proposal in the Plan, which goes with the grain of a suggestion made on this Blog last year, in turn picking up on an idea long promoted by the Canterbury Society and other knowledgeable local groups. CCC is proposing that the University be required to develop and publicly present a Master Plan for campus development.(see draft policy EMP7 UKC masterplan. for the precise wording used at present ).

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Climbing an oak tree, Dover down field, picnic 5th may 2013

This is good news for both the host and university communities, because it would mean the piecemeal, ad hoc and disjointed approach taken in recent years, shying away from rational comparison of alternative options, and eschewing systematic critical scrutiny, would in future be considered unacceptable. Indeed, it is very difficult  to see how the original  2011 Chaucer Fields proposals, and arguably even the 2012 Keynes III proposals, could  have been countenanced if such a strategic framework document had existed. In my view, it is just a shame that it may take the strong arm of local government mandate, rather than the University’s  own responsible voluntary initiative, to ensure this level of transparency and accountability is set in place for the future (for the benefit of both communities).

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Bounds-beating St Dunstan’s parishioners, lead by Reverend Mark Ball,  trying to clarify location of ancient boundary with St Stephen’s parish , 5th may 2013

Various other aspects of the District Plan and the associated appraisals are clearly potentially relevant for the future of Southern Slopes too. But the single most obvious and direct implication is how CCC have responded to the University’s suggestion that the land could be used for extensive residential housing development, a proposal in the system from several years ago, even while the Chaucer Conference Centre etc proposals were also being mooted (this is confused and confusing; see CFPS discusson of  the SHLAA for an earlier attempt to clarify). Despite the University of Kent’s offer, for now at least it seems that CCCare intending to rule out this proposal.

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Young picnic enthusiast explaining significance of picnic to passing dog-walker, 5th may

Why the provisional rejection?  This seems to be because CCC have affirmed their recognition, following a ‘technical’ analysis by AMEC consultants (see SHLAA-sites-Analysis), that the unspoilt land here is of real landscape and environmental  significance for the District (an analysis consistent also with the values implicit in the draft landscape appraisal documents accompanying the District Plan)

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English bagpipes, Dover down field, Chaucer fields, 5th may

This can be contrasted with the submission written by the heads of the University Estates department, and submitted to CCC last  year, as part of the earlier round of intelligence gathering to inform the District Plan. This bizarrely inward looking document (which was not considered or signed off by the University Council prior to submission) finds no room at all to account for landscape, environmental or social considerations. It is framed entirely as if the ‘business case’ of the University,  narrowly construed in reductionist terms, is all that matters (Click Submission to the CCC Local Plan 131112 REDACTED for the publicly available version of the Estates department’s submission, obtained  by Chaucer Fielder through a Freedom of Information request, ).

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Young picnic enthusiast still explaining picnic to passing dog-walker, 5th may

Coming back to the AMECreport, personally I would have liked to see more recognition given  to the benefits of the unspoilt land here as local green open space with demonstrably very high amenity, recreational and leisure value for both the host and University communities. However,  the fact that CCC does give significant weight at least to landscape and environmental considerations in this context  is encouraging.

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Picnickers and St Dunstan’s bounds-beaters cross paths, Dover Down field, Chaucer fields, 5th may 2013

Moreover, if these characteristics are considered important in deciding about whether development is permissible for residential housing proposals, they would also need to be recognised as important if any future planning application for a conference centre/hotel or student accommodation does materialise in the months ahead. (This is also hinted at in the material elsewhere in the draft Local Plan on tourism). Otherwise, the policy in relation to the character and value of this land could be characterised as inconsistent and incoherent.

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Buttercups, and may flower (hawthorn) in Jack Cade’s carvet, Bushy Acres, Chaucer fields, early June 2013

Indeed, it could be speculated that the expected planning application for a University conference centre/hotel etc has itself failed to materialise as forecast because of how the residential housing suggestion is dealt with in the draft Local Plan. That’s to say, perhaps we have seen no application because the pro-development group in the University has itself finally understood that decision making in this setting is now demonstrably not  just about their narrowly construed ‘the business case’, but must also factor in other, broader criteria which relate to the public interest. (Although it is the future rather than the current local plan which we are considering, it is relevant because it send a clear message about CCC’s general ‘direction of policy travel’ to both current and future developers).

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Cathedral view with Southern Slopes, prior to recent bench repair, early spring 2013

We could also expect that the situation could be evolving internally in terms of the balance of power between leading individual figures in the University’s power structures.The views of the main public champion of the Chaucer Conference Centre proposal and co-author of the aforementioned Estates Department submission, Professor Keith Mander, are becoming less relevant as he is soon to be replaced.

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Cathedral view and Southern Slopes, with new bench, later in  spring 2013 (with thanks to the front line staff of the Estates Department for the repair, and looking after the place)

However, for now this must all remain speculation. It is still quite possible that the University will still submit a planning application for  the Chaucer Conference Centre in the months ahead:its track record is not encouraging, after all.  Moreover, it is also still possible that the Southern Slopes, while rejected provisionally as a site for mass residential housing development at this stage, could come back onto the agenda in a later, revised version of the plan.

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Cathedral and Marlowe theatre viewed from Dover Down field, Chaucer fields, June 2013

It needs to be remembered that this is still a draft, and further development sites could theoretically be added between now and the finalisation of the Plan. It may well be that a coalition of developer and pro-developer interests in the University could seek to  exert  pressure  on CCC to reconsider, even though it has already articulated clear reasons for rejecting the site for development. Those of us who wish to see the Southern Slopes continue to be respected and protected as unspoilt space,will need to be vigilant,continuing to monitor planning applications and the trajectory of the Local Plan as it moves from its current draft status towards the finalised version in the month ahead.

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Chilling and climbing trees, Dover Down field, Chaucer fields picnic 5th may 2013

Archaeological Developments at Keynes III: Date for your Diaries

In the last Blog, I alerted readers to the significance of the ongoing excavations of the  Canterbury Archeaological Trust (CAT) on the Keynes III site, which seem likely to be running for a good deal of the summer period.  I am pleased to report that CAT are arranging for an open day on Thursday 25th July.  This will be an exciting opportunity to learn more about our local pre-history. There will be tours of the site, and a chance to look at the finds. CAT want as many people as possible to attend. Please do get in touch by emailing chaucerfieldspicnicsociety@gmail.com if you would like to participate.  .

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Blackcap at bottom of Bushy Acres field, southern part of Chaucer Fields, June 2013

All best wishes

Chaucer Fielder

Chaucer Fields Picnic society

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Favourite climbing oak in sea of buttercups, Dover Down field, Chaucer fields, June 2013

Postscript: Some of you attended and enjoyed the Roystercatcher’s ceilidh, raising funds for the Save Chaucer Fields group, last november. I am pleased to let you know there’ll be an informal Roystercatchers ceilidh this saturday 22 June, 7pm-9pm, St Dunstans church hall. Entry is only £3, and although not an SCF-CFPS fundraising event, it will be a chance to meet friends from the fields and catch up on news. Please find here a practice ceilidh poster june 2013. Please email roystercatchers@gmail.com  if you would like to come along.

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From Bulldozers, bees and bounds….to pre-history,presidents and picnics

One White Sugar University Road view

source: One White Sugar, Faversham (see Blog text below )

This Blog is admittedly something of a rag-bag of information and observations. If it is the chaucer fields ‘picnic’ aspect that you are here to find out about, Sunday 5th May is the key date for your diary. Please scroll down to the end of the Blog. But I hope there are other points of interest in what follows.

No news: expected Chaucer Conference Centre planning application

The nearest thing to news here is what  hasn’t happened. The University’s Chaucer Conference Centre planning application, expected to have materialised by now (on the basis of what University authorities chose to tell us last year), has not done so. Unfortunately, no news is not necessarily good news in this case. Although there are ongoing and imminent changes of personnel at the most senior level at the University which we might hope could lead to fresh thinking on this matter, there is as yet no evidence of policy change. So we’ve no obvious reason to believe the University has abandoned its plans to replace fields, trees and beautiful vistas with tarmac, multi-storey buildings and high rise blocks. It seems most likely that delays beyond its control, or deliberate stalling, explain this latest episode of policy drift.

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One of the  favourite oak trees amongst climbers, with the cathedral and marlowe theatre in the background. Southern part of Dover down field, chaucer fields, april 2013

Unspoilt Southern  Slopes Imagery 

Happily, spring in with us in earnest at last. The unspoilt Southern Slopes, including chaucer fields, are now coming to life with verdant fresh foliage, the hum of bees and other insects, and resonant birdsong. This includes the melodious singing of robins, wrens, blackbirds and thrushes; the chirping of house sparrows and dunnocks; the cackling of the several members of the crow family that frequent the fields; the repetitive calls of chiff-chaffs, tits and  finches; and the drumming and characteristic laugh-like cries of great spotted and green woodpeckers.

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Honey bee, Bushy Acres field, middle part of chaucer fields, April 2013

No new photos from Mark Kilner this time, I’m afraid (see previous Blog and Blogroll, right). But I did stumble across the image at the top of  the Blog. This is a striking artistic representation from Nigel Wallace, founder of the Faversham business White One Sugar, which specialise in posters and cards capturing iconic Kentish and national scenes. The style is inspired by mid twentieth century railway advertising posters. They have developed a number of Canterbury images. You’ll notice the one here captures the Cathedral framed by the unspoilt landscape. This is famously  part of the remarkable panoramic views whose integrity would  be undermined forever if building south of University  road and east of Chaucer College were to proceed. Nigel tells me that this is  one of their best selling representations of Canterbury.

A Pesticide Free Zone

In what follows, I’ll revert to interweaving some more of my own amateur photographic efforts into the  text this time round. I have paid  some attention this time to life which is able to flourish by virtue of the fact that this land has never been subjected  to pesticides, chemical sprays or other contaminants over the years, unlike much other proximate land. This is a topical international issue at the moment, with the ongoing debate on whether or not to control much more tightly at European level the use of the pesticides with wildlife in mind  – especially  in the light  of the dramatic decline in bee numbers in recent years.

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Small Copper,  Dover Down Field, late may 2012

To underscore the value  of the fields in their  unspoilt state from this perspective, I’ve included photos from the last few days,and last summer, of the commonest types of  bees and  the butterflies which are in evidence here at these  times of year.  A less well know manifestation of the fields’ spray-free past is  the existence of a wide range of fungi. A friend of mine who was studying botany some years ago, told me that in a single morning of mycology field work, he catalogued at least 35 varieties of fungi on the Southern Slopes. The combination of trees and uncontaminated open space on the slopes is especially conducive to their flourishing.   

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small tortoiseshell, south western part of Dover Down field, chaucer fields, april 2013

CAT excavations beginning: Keynes III site north of unspoilt Southern Slopes

Anyone expecting to experience the wonderful tranquillity which has been a signature feature of the fields for so many years will have been struck by the uncharacteristic temporary intrusion of noise during the day time this month. As people who venture to the northern part of the fields, or University Road users will have witnessed, the reason is that the diggers and bull dozers have been active to the north and east of Beverley Farm. They are clearing the ground in historic Saw Pett field for the ‘Keynes  III development’ student accommodation blocks. As a condition of giving planning permission, Canterbury City Council required that Canterbury Archeaological Trust (CAT) conduct excavations on the site.

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Initial trench at Keynes III site, east of Beverley farm and north of University Road,            4 april 2013

Seeing the fields close to Beverley Farmhouse being dug up in this way is a troubling sight – in my opinion, especially sad in the context of the University never having demonstrated convincingly that other, alternative sites –  including Park Wood and Giles Lane car park (with compensatory underground parking) –  could not have been developed. However, unlike land further south, this part of campus was already earmarked for commercial development several years ago.

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Digger for Keynes III site close to Beverley Farm, april 2013

Moreover, encountering this ‘development’  so close by will, for sure, harden the resolve of the many people already committed to preserving the unspoilt  fields further south, below University road, to do everything possible to ensure this can never happen there. Witnessing the digging will also surely raise awareness of the threatened status of the proximate area amongst regular and routine University road  users who, up until now, may not have given the issue much attention.

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Working on the Keynes III site, mid April 2013

There’s also something positive to report on how the process will unfold. Regular readers of this Blog will be aware how important CAT’s work has already been in drawing on historical documentary evidence on the heritage value of the setting of Beverley Farm – both north and south. But the ongoing archeological work seems set to systematically evidence, for the first time, that the significance of this place for human settlement  long pre-dates the medieval origins of the farmhouse over half a millenium ago. As expected given the ancient impact of man on the shape of the land and character of the place, CAT have advised me that some Pre-Historic finds are already in evidence.

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Honey bee, Dover Down field, mid april 2013

This  is hardly surprising, since in very local terms the Beverley Farm setting  is obviously nearby to  the iron age centres of Canterbury and Bigbury Camp. Indeed from a county-wide perspective, this part of Kent is especially rich in prehistoric settlements (see Alan Ward’s chapter ‘Overall Distribution of Prehistoric Settlement sites’ in Lawson and Killinggray’s Historical Atlas of Kent, Phillimore, 2004). Perhaps this will remind University authorities that the campus’s presence here accounts for just a fleeting moment of historical time: It should be approaching its land stewardship responsibilities with great care and humility.

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Male chaffinch, southern part of Chaucer Fields, mid april 2013

Indeed, I think this is a good chance for people from both communities to work together for a common heritage interest, and the dig is going to be ongoing for several months. So please watch do continue to watch this space for .

  • updates on finds as the excavation unfolds; and
  • opportunities for the local and university communities to get actively involved as volunteers in the process of revealing our past.
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Buds on one of the apple trees presumably dating back to Mount’s nursery days earlier in the 20th century. Central southern part of  chaucer fields, april 2013

Kent Union election for sabbatical officers 2013/14

I have written to congratulate the President-elect of Kent Union, Chelsea Moore, on her electoral success last month. She’ll take up the sabbatical position as head of the University of Kent’s students’ union, covering the academic year 2013/14, in the autumn. What has this got to do with the fields? For now, Kent Union’s adoption of a policy to ‘campaign to save chaucer fields’ in response to the all student vote (ASV) last year has not really generated any visible results under the current leadership, despite suggestions  reported in an earlier Blog that these might be pending. But we can I suppose assume that it has helped shaped the approach taken in handling the issue in behind-the-scenes discussions with the University authorities. And there is of course still ample time for the existing leadership to take a more publicly apparent contribution.

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Spring growth inside one of  Chaucer Fields’ many hedges, april 2013

But looking further into the future let’s hope that Kent Union’s approach will become bolder and more transparent. In a pre election statement, Chelsea chose to emphasise how “Research highlighted that students feel there is a lack of social areas on campus where they are not prompted to spend money. I would lobby the University for more communal areas on campus for people to relax and socialise in comfort.” ( see About Chelsea Moore).

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Blue tit glimpsed through Jack Cade’s carvet, central part of chaucer fields, april 2013

Protection of the currently unspoilt Southern Slopes clearly goes hand in hand with this aspiration: it is indeed precisely a communal area which allows for relaxation (as well as much else besides, of course). Combining this with the policy commitment she will inherit from the 2012 ASV, we can hope that the protection of chaucer fields  will be an important priority for Kent Union in 2013/14

Bee, Dover Down field

Honey Bee, Dover Down field, end of may 2012

5th May: Beating the Bounds… and a picnicking invitation

The historical fascination of Beverley Farmhouse and  the Southern Slopes are not just to do with pre-history or the medieval period. One of the most fascinating documents to be turned up by CAT in their 2011 research was an early eighteenth century map. (See Hill’s map, with the proposed 2011 ‘development’ plan boundary incongruously superimposed. This is a bit confusing to the modern observer, because north and south are inverted!)   The resonant historical field names on this 1706 map (which I have resurrected and used in this Blog over the past year) are striking. But one thing also in evidence is that the cartographer is unable to give a clear parochial boundary! This is because the land close to where the double hedge (“Roper’s twitchell”) is now prominent was then clearly not part of either St Stephens or St Dunstans parish. The issue was only resolved by magistrates, with the parish boundary unambiguously defined in law some years later.

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Bell Harry tower and Bushy Acres field trees, Chaucer fields, April 2013

Against  this backdrop, the continuation of the ‘beating the bounds‘ tradition, to demarcate where the St Stephens-St Dunstans boundary was finally situated, is especially interesting. Two years ago, Reverend Justin Lewis-Anthony led his parishioners over these fields as part of the process of beating the bounds of St Stephens. This year on sunday 5 May Reverend Mark Ball will be doing the same for neighbouring St Dunstans, including walking through Chaucer Fields. By so doing, he will also be drawing attention to the importance attached by the church to land with which it is historically deeply associated, and which is currently highly valued and widely used by the local community.  If  you are free on that day , please come to witness this tradition.

Unspoilt view of St Dunstan's church, June 2012

Unspoilt view of St Dunstan’s church from close to University road, from June 2012

We will be holding a  picnic which aims to coincide with the presence of the St Dunstans parishioners on the field. It will involve the usual combination of music, recreation, relaxation and socialising. It will almost certainly be in the afternoon, but more details will be circulated by email, texts, tweets and on the Save Chaucer Fields Facebook page closer to the time.  Hope to see you there!

Beating bounds from Foxworthy

Source: Customs in Kent, Tony Foxworthy, 2008, Country books, reproduced with permission

Best wishes

Chaucer Fielder

Chaucer Fields Picnic Society